About

What is LondonVolcano?

The LondonVolcano is a nearly 3 meter tall working replica of Soufrière St. Vincent volcano. We built this is 2014, for an exhibition at the Natural History Museum in London; and the model will be ‘on tour’ over the summer of 2015. If you have any ideas or suggestions for other places to take the volcano – and some funding to help us move it – just let us know!

Come along to any of our exhibitions to learn about how volcanoes work, why we care about them, and what we can do to prepare for the hazards that they present.


Who is involved?

The project is is a collaborative effort between scientists based at the Department of Earth Sciences at the University of Oxford, the School of Environmental Sciences at the University of East Anglia, and the University of the West Indies Seismic Research Centre.


Who has funded it?

The LondonVolcano is a spin-off from the STREVA Project– a project about strengthening resilience in volcanic areas, specifically in Latin America and the Caribbean. One focus of the STREVA Project is to learn about how people and communities have lived with volcanic risk and responded to volcanic crises in the past; so that we can improve our capacity to prepare for the future. One of the STREVA research sites is the Soufrière St. Vincent volcano in the Caribbean, and LondonVolcano is one way that we have been gathering stories and records of the past activity of this important volcano. The original LondonVolcano exhibition was funded by grants from the Universities of East Anglia and Oxford, with the aim of sharing with the public our work that funded by the UK research councils, NERC and ESRC. In 2015, NERC have provided some additional funding as part of their 50th anniversary celebrations.

 

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  1. […] the Natural History Museum between Monday 9th & Friday 13th June to witness the London Volcano https://londonvolcano.com/about/ in action (I apologise for plugging the work of the other […]

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